Det regnar på vår kärlek

Det regnar på vår kärlek


It Rains on Our Love You might be wondering who I am,
and what I’m doing in this story. I can’t tell you that straight off. I venture to say that it’s a secret. I can tell you my name… No, that really doesn’t matter. It is my duty to acquaint you
with what’s about to take place. It’s raining. I hope you’ve noticed
that it’s raining. It’s a Wednesday rain.
An October rain. And it’s chilly. Hold on!
Here’s one of the leading characters. A single third-class ticket
to Furusele. Will I make it? – 36.25.
– And to the station before that one? – 32.90.
– And the one before? – 30.80.
– And the one before? – 29.60.
– I’ll take that one. NORTHBOUND TRAINS Morning. Oh, I’m terribly sorry. No need to hurry. If you’re supposed
to make it, you will. You weren’t supposed to make it. – Were the apples ruined?
– I didn’t have that many. But I did save us one each.
Here you go. – Thanks.
– Better wipe it first. – I must have fallen asleep.
– That kind of sleep is wonderful. – Have you been studying me?
– Why, of course! I took my chance. You think the guard would let you
sit here all night without a suitcase? He thinks we’re travelling together. – Is something missing?
– I had a handkerchief somewhere. – It’s wet.
– I’ve had a terrible cold. – October’s a rough month.
– I’ve had this cold all autumn. What can you do
when there are always people around? Yeah, what can you do…? At one o’clock, they’ll kick us out.
What will we do then? I’d better head home
and wait for the morning train. Why didn’t you do that straight away?
You don’t have to answer that. I’ll manage.
It’s only a few hours away. You shouldn’t
be pacing the streets at night. – I’m stronger than you think.
– Don’t forget this. I suspect it’s still raining. You’ll
have to find some place to stay. Where? Abracadabra… I kept this in reserve. The Salvation Army offers
cheap accommodation, if you’re lucky. Your suitcase will make it
look legitimate, as they say. Getting all jittery now?
I haven’t said that I will touch you. Do you have any luggage? This bloody society! A suitcase means
that you’re a good person. What they consider to be
a good person… “The Lord is my shepherd;
I shall not want.” Right… Do you have a comb? Thanks. – When’s your train?
– At eight, something. – It’s almost time.
– It can leave, for all I care. What do you think of me? I don’t think at all.
I haven’t got round to that. Your average bird who takes off
with the first good guy she meets? It wasn’t the first guy,
but it happened to be the best one. You were so eager.
Who are you? – Your hands are so white.
– I’ll tell you some other time. Maggi… How wonderful it would be
to start a new life with you. – You have a new life to start?
– You could say that. What about you? I don’t want to go back to my old job. And I don’t want to go back
to my old life. I came here
to attend a school of drama. One of those silly ideas you get… That was one school of drama,
I’ll tell you. Then I worked as a maid. And then I… came there. And yesterday… – Ah, you wouldn’t believe it…
– Oh, I’ll believe it, alright. I can believe anything. I don’t want to go back home,
but city life is not good for me. – And when you grow tired of me…
– Me? – When you grow tired of me, you mean?
– We have no money. All I have is 55 öre, and how much
will that reserve of yours leave you? Maggi, you have to trust me. Why should I trust you? But there’s something
about your eyes… They don’t light up, even though you
laugh. And the back of your head… You see,
an opportunity has presented itself. It’s one heck of an opportunity, even
though I never really thought about it. But now… I’ll show you. Come, Maggi. Come! Look, Maggi. They’re all off to work. They all come from somewhere,
and they’re all going somewhere. It could be that way for us, too.
It will be that way for us, too. What wonderful nature.
Green and lovely. And what a beautiful day! It’s a good road. This is a place
where you can really feel at home. Look, we’ve got company. What a wretched little mutt. – Hi there!
– Hi, yourself. Did you see that?
He recognised me at once. A cool and sturdy fellow.
Nothing ingratiating about him. Here you go. Well, here I am, as agreed.
This here is Maggi. – You’re still alive?
– I thought I’d make a go at it. – You have your hands full?
– My fair share. – Busy, busy.
– Do you already have someone who…? – No, that’s not the problem.
– I see. – But you said that…
– I remember perfectly well what I said. A fellow who knows the ropes
is sorely needed. To cut to the chase… It’s my missus. She doesn’t like me
mixing with the old crowd. – You were never married.
– She set me straight. Made me put the shop back on its feet.
It ain’t always easy. – You’ll find out for yourself.
– I’m starting to find out. – I guess that’s that.
– My husband’s very thorough. – It’s a matter of principle.
– I’ve got nothing to add to that. Alright then. – Walking on the road was much better.
– Maggi, come on. – That dog’s been following us!
– Just ignore it. – Looks like a sly dog.
– Come on now, Maggi. I’ve had it! I’m cold, and it’s raining.
It’s enough to drive you insane! – You have to catch your train now.
– You’re anxious to get rid of me! It’s for your own good! If you’d only left me alone,
I would’ve been back home now. Watch out, Maggi. The train! Are you alright? I broke my leg, and it’s all
your fault! Don’t touch me! I just want to lie here
and freeze to death. You’ve only sprained your ankle.
Come on now, Maggi. I detest you! How I detest you! I should leave you here. The dog! That poor dog.
What if the train ran him over! – What is it?
– You were right. That’s one crazy dog. – Come on now, Maggi.
– No… – How are you?
– What a question! Hey! You can sit down and rest
a while over there. Come on now. How are you feeling? It won’t stop raining,
for crying out loud. It looks sturdy
and fit for winter accommodation. I feel sorry for him.
Maybe he just wants some company. You just lie down and rest for a bit. – You never said a word about this.
– What would you have done about it? It’s raw in here.
It feels colder indoors than outdoors. – We could make a fire…
– Don’t just stand there! The logs aren’t ours… But I guess, taking a few logs
won’t make much difference. I’m hungry. I’ve had nothing
but a spot of coffee all day. Go to sleep.
That will ease your hunger pangs. We’ll come up with something later. David! There’s a cupboard over there.
Go and have a look. People always leave tins behind. Oh, sardines, David.
Imagine sardines… It’s probably locked.
Cupboards usually are. At least go and take a look.
Hurry up. You have the hatchet. Maggi, you mustn’t ask me.
Anything but that. You broke open the front door without
my consent. Now open that small one! Maggi, that was different.
You were soaked and tired. – I’m positive there’s food in there.
– It wouldn’t be ours. – The logs aren’t ours…
– I’ll get you indoors to warm you up… – …but breaking open a cupboard? No.
– Well, I’m not afraid of that cupboard! – It can be dangerous.
– I’m hungry and I want food! Let me go! – You asked me this morning who I am.
– Save it ’til later. I want food! Maggi, I’ve done time! I spent a year in prison,
and I was released last Monday. It wasn’t the first time, either. – That’s why your hands are so white.
– What did you expect? Some guy from the Upper Ten
in disguise, like in the movies? – This time, things will work out.
– I’m worried. Don’t be. I’ll keep my word. That’s not what I mean.
You broke open that door. – We’d better leave.
– No one is coming here. – Not this time of year.
– A passer-by might get curious. – He might call the police!
– No, Maggi. We’re staying put. We’ll have a look in that cupboard.
Where else would we spend the night? And then? What happens tomorrow? That’s another story. I hope I’m not intruding.
I didn’t know anyone lived here. It’s only temporary… Inspecting your summer cottage?
Nice little place to have. I’m doing a little constructing
over that way. I saw the lights were on.
Thought I’d pop in… – …and buy myself a cup of coffee.
– I don’t think there is any coffee. Is there, David? – Newly-weds?
– Like she said, we can’t help you. I’ll give you some coffee.
I have some in my rucksack. We’re not overly fond of coffee,
and we had some before we left town. A small cup wouldn’t hurt, David. – The coffee’s in the bean, I’m afraid.
– We don’t have a grinder. My, my, you’re awkward.
You just crush it with an empty bottle. – We don’t have any empty bottles.
– You must have some in the cupboard. The cupboard is empty. What about over there in the nook?
The left-hand corner? Have you taken a proper look? The left-hand corner? There were empty bottles there
the last time I was here. You see, this is my cottage. And if the cupboard is empty,
the reason for that is… …that this is not the first time
I have visitors. – Run, David, while you can!
– Calm down. We’ll explain. Yes, you’ll have some explaining to do,
young man. – What’s wrong with your foot?
– That’s why we came here. – I all but forced him.
– I can imagine… You see, dear girl,
that if your foot’s the problem you get back on the road
and wait for a bus. Step outside. He’ll get off
with a suspended sentence. That’s what a chap like him needs
in order to shape up. You’re young enough
to put a stop to all this silliness. You don’t know what you’ve done.
He’ll get two years, minimum. He was just released.
We were just about to start a new life. – A funny way of starting a new life.
– You have a roof over your head… …and coffee, and a full stomach.
You egotistical old bugger! I’ll set your shack on fire!
Your rotten little cottage. Hey… How do I know you’re not lying? I don’t care. Get out of here, or I’ll scream! Easy does it. If you’ve laid a finger on Maggi, I’ll
haunt your cottage, you old bugger! I will hate you to death! Just a misunderstanding, officers.
There’s nothing to report. – I’m not too sure about that.
– Do as I say. It was just a misunderstanding.
Let him go. Very well. We’ll let it slip
because we know you, Mr. Håkansson. Where do you live? I haven’t decided yet.
I’m flat hunting. You’re free to stay in my cottage.
Light a fire, and it’s nice and cosy. You can rent it for a time.
It’s 12 kronor a week. – That, you can afford.
– I haven’t found a job yet. Pop down to the Garden Centre.
He’s always in need of help. – You’re not messing with me?
– If you can’t pay, you’re out. I collect the rent on Saturdays.
See you. – Here I am.
– You’re a free man? – Absolutely. Free as a bird.
– They let you go? That’s one silly dog,
but he’s a good dog. What did I tell you? He wants company.
He’s lonely, just like us. He’s probably a police dog.
He only bites policemen. – What have you got there?
– The gadget I threw at the dog. – Is it a music box?
– Yes… It sounds a bit off,
but I think it’s meant to be a melody. – It might have been beautiful once.
– Are you keeping it? Yes… Dented and rusty and worthless,
with what sounds like a melody. There was this parson
back at the nick… He talked about a lost melody. No one failed to see
that he was referring to us. We ought to keep it. This is nice… – What about tomorrow?
– That’s another story. The train… – The train!
– What about it? Your ticket! We can get a refund.
How much was it? – 29.65.
– That’s a fortune. You still have it? – I still have it. No need to look.
– There’s every need to look. – It’s not there.
– No, it’s not there. – You said it was.
– No. – I said I still have it.
– So, where is it? – You made a curler out of the ticket?
– Guess you’ll make me eat my words. Our beautiful ticket. I’ll make you eat the ticket. You wanted sardines, right? Good boy… Is that absolutely necessary? – Well, sometimes.
– That can’t be possible. – You rent this place?
– Sure do. I saw the mutt inspect the place
when you moved in. You noticed that, did you? You live
on the other side of the road, right? I meant to drop by and say hello,
but you’re welcome here. It’s a makeshift place.
We always have plenty to do. – Away all day…
– I see. We’ve been watching you. I’d say you’re alright. And if you want the morning paper,
our neighbour will deliver it for free. – Ah, here she comes. Hi!
– What do you want? Why don’t you save a copy
for this chap, too. “Why don’t you…!” Hanna Ledin. Bye, fellows! She’s a bit surly, but it’s in the bag. – Are there more of you in the gang?
– We make up the core, so to speak. – You’re a lucky guy.
– I never said otherwise. – You should have thought about that.
– Pros and cons, you know… – It’s a risky business.
– I could support a faithful wife. – We’re not just any old pedlars.
– We’ve organised this whole district. He’s put life into the door-to-door
business. We’re very methodical. – The Maria South district today.
– Right you are. Business to do. Well… Give this to your bird
as a welcoming gift. – Thank you.
– Thanks. – For you, from the fellows over there.
– What is it? – A rat-trap.
– Oh, my God! Do we have rats? Don’t worry. It’s just for show. You can still keep cheese in it. WHERE DAVID GOT A JOB This is nice. Very nice. This is also nice.
This is almost nicer. Tomatoes…
You can never grow enough of them. We could double our sales.
People are mad about tomatoes. That’s for sure. Tomatoes, tomatoes… Isn’t it just great?
Fruit, that’s the future for you. Fruit, sunshine and flowers.
Especially fruit. Make a note of it.
This is the profession of the future. And a decent one, too.
Just great. Absolutely great. People want to be slim.
They’re crazy about tomatoes. Tomatoes contain everything.
That could become a key industry. As long as the country
isn’t flooded with bananas… Phew, it’s hot! Mark my words. It’s going to snow. Psst. I’ll just pop down to Port Arthur
and grab myself a beefsteak. – Where’s my husband?
– In town, on business. – When did he leave?
– Just before noon. I might have known as much. – How much is the hyacinth?
– Three kronor. – You keep a neat record, I take it.
– Oh, yes. Down to the last krona. In this household, we owe our
prosperity down to the last öre. Perhaps you’re not used to dealing
with anything smaller than kronor. Tell me… The flowers that you took with you
last night, were those for a delivery? – No, I just brought them home.
– I see… – They were a bit wilted.
– You hide them amongst the fresh ones. We do our best here,
but Andersson didn’t mind. Mister Andersson. In any case, he didn’t mind. Was he aware of it last night? – Well, no, but…
– I see. That’s all I wanted to know. Our daughter is having
her piano lesson. Sounds like a tricky tune to play. I was a bit delayed.
Lindell can go out to lunch now. Do you mind
his going out to lunch now, Elise? Lindell’s going out to lunch
suits me just fine. You can take my bicycle. I believe it’s going to snow. How do you know he’ll be back,
once he’s on that bicycle? – He lives just over there.
– Our beautiful antique coffee kettle… Mother’s favourite, the family heir-
loom, went missing when he showed up. – How do you explain that?
– I don’t. I don’t think he did it. – If you drive away this assistant, I…
– You’ll what? Forget it. He’ll leave
with all our worldly possessions. – I don’t like that man.
– He’s reliable. But information is on its way.
I’ll suss him out. I have my ways. – He is reliable!
– I know what we can rely on him for. Turn round. Leaving the shop like that! Exhale. You think tomatoes will save you?
You stink! WINTER CAME, AND SNOW,
AND CHRISTMAS EVE AFTERNOON We should have a Christmas tree.
A small one to put on the table. – We can’t afford to be sentimental.
– I know. – Håkansson wants his rent, too.
– I know! It’s too late to buy one, anyway. – What did you have in mind?
– There are always Christmas trees left. Exceptionally many this year, they say. – That’s stealing. That’s theft.
– No, that’s saving them from the dump. Maggi, dearest. What if everyone…
No, I don’t like it. The thing is, they wouldn’t. David… Like it. No! Absolutely not! Nobody’s had this idea before. Divide the year by 13,
and every month will have 28 days. I’ll submit it to
the Royal Academy of Sciences. What do you think, miss Ledin? – What good will that do?
– If every month has 28 days… …every day will fall on the same date
every single year. Every day on the same date…? No money in it,
according to Steel Beater but I would acquire a good reputation
in society. – Father Christmas!
– I’ve been to the Christmas fair. What’s that expression…
“Has everyone been good this year?” Would anyone like a Christmas gift,
even though it’s New Year’s Eve? Take it out. – A radio!
– It’s just a small one. It doesn’t work properly,
but it gives off sound. Where did you get it? You don’t get things.
You acquire them. – Imagine, a radio!
– What I’d like to know is… – But I’m Father Christmas, Madam.
– Quiet. – I can hear something…
– Happy new year. … and once again,
we wish one another a happy new year. A happy new year. David, look at the star. A star makes a beautiful companion,
don’t you think? And a new year has just begun.
Things are on the up-and-up. We’re just like everybody else.
We have a milk bill… We pay both local and state taxes! And in February,
I have to fill in a tax return. A few months ago, we had nothing.
Now we have debts, like everyone else. Maggi, I’ve been thinking… How about getting married?
That way, people can’t object. What is it, Maggi? It’s nothing. At this point, we could stop following
the story about David and Maggi. However,
there are a few loose ends left. Why won’t Maggi marry David? And another thing,
regarding the gardener: Do you get the feeling
that he and David get along famously? But on the other hand,
it was mostly the missus… What about the radio, the coffee kettle
and other bric-a-brac? I simply don’t understand why David
never thinks twice. Neither does Maggi. Maybe things
have been going too well for them. Well, you never can tell.
You never can tell. But I guess we’ll see. Håkansson picked up the rent.
This was a Saturday. One, two, three, four… …five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten. David… I have a proposition. – You’ll buy this cottage from me.
– Buy the cottage…? – You’re pulling my leg.
– For a reasonable price. 1,000 kronor. Then you don’t know
what 1,000 kronor looks like. A thousand kronor
is what you’ll pay me. Where can you find a flat that cheap? And they run background checks
on their tenants… Do I run background checks? No. The ground rent is 20 kronor a year,
made payable to the town. – You have to act fast.
– What if we can’t, or won’t? Then you’ll have to return
whence you came. You should’ve told me that
from the start, Håkansson. Having you as tenants was never
my intention. It’s against the law. Living here on one’s own is fine,
renting the place is not. But I had to let you stay here
to get you to swallow the bait. Where will we get 1,000 kronor? Give me 25 kronor a week, and the
whole lot will be yours within a year. There’s plenty of fruit.
Delicious fruit. And flowers, young madam. Flowers! The potatoes are first class. They’re tender, with firm skin. I’ll give you some seed potatoes.
Time for a signature. – I have to sign it?
– That way, I have you in my power. I can follow you to every workplace
you’ll ever have, if need be. But that won’t be necessary. You’re the paying kind. – Give me your pen.
– Don’t sign it, David. – Don’t sign it, just yet.
– If it doesn’t suit you… – Think twice.
– Does the extra 13 kronor bother you? – No, that’s not it.
– Then, what? We have to act. Don’t sign it. That’s it for now, I take it. I’ve got people waiting for me at home. – Where did you find this?
– Out in the field. One of the grandchildren… That time… Children fly the coop… Before you know it, they’re gone. The grandchildren grow up… Before you know it,
their tiny hands are thin and bony. Strangers… Gone, all of them. Do the decent thing
and be gone by the morning. Thank you all the same, Mr. Håkansson. This was the first one I nailed. It was lying among the waste wood
at a building site on Åsö Street… …that summer. Don’t thank me.
I always do everything for a reason. – What about your shoes?
– You just fixed them. They’re fine. Better fix these things
before it’s time to become a vagabond. Why don’t you want to live here? – I want to live here with you.
– You do? It didn’t sound like it. – But I do.
– Didn’t you hear what Håkansson said? There’s something you need to know. I’m pregnant, David.
I was pregnant when we met. – What the hell are you telling me?
– I was already pregnant. I should have told you right away. You’re damned right. Well, now you know. You don’t have to commit yourself.
That’s why I didn’t want you to sign. – Who was he?
– No need to be jealous. I can’t even remember his face. It was last autumn,
at the amusement park. We went into the forest afterwards.
I can’t believe I did it… You didn’t even know the man,
and still, you went with him. I went with you, too!
I don’t hear any complaints. I won’t take care of his damned kid.
Is that understood?! I’m not asking you to.
Don’t you dare damn the baby! CABLE
ANCHORING PROHIBITED What’s wrong? Are you ill? III? What’s that? I’m hurting. When I close my eyes…
I see the most beautiful colours. – Maybe it was something you ate.
– Ate? Ow! Nice place, don’t you think?
Quiet and cosy. You had a job, food on the table,
and a bed. You had a girl who was quite special,
all things considered. But your self-esteem… – Some other time, okay?
– Sure, sure. It’s bloody complicated. But you do know one thing.
You saw what he was like, just now. Loneliness…
Beware of loneliness, David. Take care not to end up alone. So… it’s you. Won’t you come in? They’re not dangerous. The big one over there
is a bit evil, that’s all. – You’ve thought it over?
– Yes, I’ve thought it over. And you’ve come to a decision? – Yes, I’ve come to a decision.
– Just like I knew you would. You’re doing the right thing.
You should always think twice. Sit down. And here we have the piece of paper. Sign it there. But… read it through first. Think very carefully before you act. Once it’s signed,
it’s irrevocably signed. It’s customary to confirm the deal. Or maybe you don’t touch spirits? I think I’ll pass. I am not surprised. You’re studying my photographs. My wife. Those are my children,
when they were little. These are my grandchildren…
when they were little. The clothes are different.
The clothes may change… …but the children are the same,
when they are little. – Do you live here, all alone?
– I’m not alone! They’re all waiting for me! I bought this flat thirty years ago,
during the last war. It’s mine! They can’t evict me! I’ll grow very old.
I’ll outlive them all… those bastards. You can leave now. – Hello.
– Hi there! – You’re late.
– I was held up. – I bought the evening paper…
– Splendid, splendid. What was that good for?
Look at him, devouring the comics. – Have you seen this one?
– It’s horrible to see him like that. – Time to get a move on.
– It’s not that late. No, it’s not that late. Why did you kick me? I hope you’re not nasty to your bird. If that’s the case,
you’re not a very clever chap. I did something nasty,
but that’s all over now. Maggi… All of this is ours now. The little fellow is welcome,
since he’s yours. We’ll go to the registrar’s office
and ask to have the banns published. – Are those the clergymen?
– I guess so. I only ever saw the one back home,
but he dressed like a farmer. – They probably earn a lot.
– They do have a great responsibility. Whose turn is it? – What can I do for you?
– We’d like to have the banns published. – Did you bring your credentials?
– Yes. – Here you go.
– You will settle down in this parish? We already live here –
allotment 155. Not so fast.
Are the two of you living there? So, you’re cohabiting
with your fiancée? – Well, yes…
– Neither of you is registered here. Registered? I was thinking… Banns take place
in the parish of the bride. – Why’s that?
– “Why’s that”? Is that really necessary? Or send your credentials to the census
office and state your new address. They’ll inform Furusele and us,
and then return it to you and you can present it here.
Then we’ll put up the banns. It takes time, and your fiancé
will have to demand a transfer, too. – It sounds a bit complicated…
– Not at all, my dear chap. Things take time when you don’t
keep your documents up-to-date. – Your documents are…
– How long will it take? You see… I see. When are you due? – Some time in April.
– It will be all right, I’m sure. Wait a minute…
Where did you say you live? An allotment…? The small cottage
belonging to the allotment? Is that wise for a woman in this state? – We hadn’t thought about that…
– Why, you have to! – There are no available places to stay.
– There are maternity homes. I seriously advise you
to take that to heart. Contact the parish lay worker today. Or it’s my duty to report allotment 155
to the social welfare office. – Can they make us do it?
– I’d say they can. We’ll be separated,
and David will be alone. My dear friends,
and I don’t mean to reproach you… You should have thought of that before.
The lay worker is available every day between 12 and 3 p.m.,
except Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays. Did they just leave? – They hardly encouraged our marriage.
– I’m sure he’s a kind man. People aren’t kind.
They’re cruel, callous and fiendish. – They don’t care about us.
– Why’s everything so complicated? When you try to conform, try to become
one of them, they put you down. – We’re not ones to beg.
– He was probably right about one thing. Living out there might not be so good.
Have you thought about that? Yes, I’ve thought about that,
but I don’t want to be apart. Neither do I. I guess we’d better
settle the matter right away. Spring came early, and David often
visited Maggi at the maternity home. You’ll be back home soon.
We’ll all sit outdoors in the sun. Oh, what a summer. We’ll make
the most of every single day. And we won’t sleep too much. I like the sound of that.
It almost sounds too good. Are you tired, my love?
It’ll soon be over. I love hearing your stories about home,
that you have good help. Everything’s just great. What about the gardener and his wife? What about them?
We have no quarrel with him. He’s quite a decent man.
The missus is a bit nasty, however… – They don’t want to see us do well.
– Everyone wants us to do well now. And things are better than ever. I didn’t think there was anyone here! Andersson? What are you doing here? – I didn’t think anyone was home.
– I can tell, by the looks of it. The spade… I knew it! This is stolen property!
My wife always suspected… All spades look the same.
They borrowed that one. My spades look nothing
like other people’s spades! Mine are branded with an A.
A for Andersson. Well, can you find an A?
A for Andersson’s imagination! These are my tools.
I carried them here myself. – Or are you saying I stole them?
– Please, dear Mrs. Ledin… No one’s suspecting Mrs. Ledin
of stealing… – Who are they?!
– Do you have a daughter? – Yes.
– Here’s a balloon. I dare say you’re a kind man. I’ll keep an eye on this place.
Mark my words! He wasn’t a kind man. Stop bringing goods here.
I won’t answer for the consequences. Making a good Christian like myself
play a part in your low farce! “Stop bringing goods!” – Do you get any of this, Steel Beater?
– Not at all. Harsh words… This is my spade! And this one is Mr. Andersson’s.
Do you recognise it? If we have something, and someone
else doesn’t, are we to do nothing? Come on. – Whistling a happy tune, are we?
– Morning. Morning, morning.
May the merriness never end. This is nice. This is nice. Here, we’ll have tomatoes.
Our finest tomatoes. Weigh out
and arrange two, no, three pyramids. And move the potato plants, would you. These geraniums are 3.50.
Those are… I’d better go and check. – Oh, I almost forgot…
– A delivery? No. My wife will be down shortly,
and I just wanted to let you know that whatever happens, I personally
have nothing against you, Lindell. But there are principles
when it comes to business. As I was saying…
There are principles, and that’s that! We’ve been informed about Lindell.
We’ve gathered information about you… …seeing that you’ve been so reticent. I always answer straight questions. That’s not our definition
of honesty and sincerity. Where was Lindell
before he came here? – Andersson only had to ask.
– Mister Andersson. Be that as it may…
You only had to ask. Things in this house have gone missing. How unfortunate. Other people are complaining
about the same problem. I hope you know what I mean.
Exactly. – And another thing…
– Speaking of principles. – I’ll…
– No, I will. Your personal life is your business,
within reason. – You cohabit with a woman!
– So does Andersson. Quiet! In my capacity as director of
The Town Garden Centre, I’ll say this: We don’t want this nice allotment area
turned into some slum area and a hot spot for lowlifes. We’d like to have decent people
around us. People with principles. And we don’t fit in, you mean.
I’ve bought the cottage, and I own it. I’m entitled to membership
in The Town Garden Centre! – Own it…?
– Don’t worry. I’m not interested. Even people like us have principles. Hold on to your hotbeds, Andersson,
before I steal them! Andersson’s Garden Centre.
I see. I see… Just a minute.
He’s standing right here. It’s for you.
It’s the maternity hospital. What’s happened? Is it something tragic? You old cow. I can’t stand
this bloody elephant polka! The child is practising!
It’s quite a difficult étude. I never learnt how to play it! It’s my ambition
to make sure my child knows it. Yes, I know. I damned the baby.
I said, “that damned kid.” “I won’t take care of his damned kid.”
Those were my exact words. Are you telling me
you’re not pleased? – It turned out the way you wanted.
– Wanted? Come on… I dare say you did want it,
to some extent. Admit it. Who knows?
You might have grown fond of the child. I guess you would have. But now,
everything turned out differently since the baby was stillborn. – You lucky devil.
– I don’t understand what you’re saying. Those were your exact thoughts. What luck! You were most likely saddened… …but I suspect
you’re also a bit pleased… …deep down inside, if truth be told. No! All I want is for Maggi
to pull through. Do you think Maggi will pull through? Don’t go. Don’t go! Do you think Maggi will pull through? David… They anaesthetised me. The doctor isn’t worried at all. You’re avoiding the things
I want to know. The doctor told us not to be sad. It had nothing to do with the cottage. It’s no one’s fault.
There’s always a next time… Maggi… He told us not to be sad. No… You’ll soon be back up on your feet. Summer’s just around the corner. Maggi… say something. Don’t just lie there,
with eyes averted. It’s so strange… When he was inside of me,
he was alive and kicking. – Where is he now?
– We mustn’t dwell on that now. No, we mustn’t dwell on that. You’re still here, thank God. Now you have something to play with. All men seem to like that. Sweep up a pile of leaves
and set it on fire. Your little fire has no friend. Either
we’re early, or everyone else is late. – All the other places are locked up.
– I hadn’t thought about that. I can see smoke over there!
They might be doing the same thing. Oh, David! It’s so exciting… It’s been like a dream,
ever since I got back. It’s like a dream now, too. All this is ours!
It will grow all summer long. I want something to grow inside of you. Me, too. Out here. Good afternoon. Good afternoon. This is David Lindell, allotment 155? – That’s right.
– I need you to sign a document. I’ve tried to get hold of you before. – What is it?
– A mere formality. The former owner, Per Håkansson,
told me that you’d bought the cottage. – Is that correct?
– What’s that? The town will construct
567 new fireplaces in this area and have cancelled the garden plots.
It was in the papers a long time ago. – What are you saying?
– You didn’t grasp what I said? – This cottage is ours!
– I understand that perfectly. Mr. Håkansson said that, too,
so I’m here to get the document signed. You can’t just evict us! Maggi… Håkansson has cheated us.
I don’t understand… – Where will we go?
– Well, that’s none of my business. – If you sign…
– No chance of a respite? – We’ve fixed and planted things.
– That can’t be helped. – I won’t sign it.
– You won’t sign it? I refuse to move.
The police will have to carry us away! We don’t know where to turn.
Won’t you help us? Madam, my job is to get your
husband’s signature on this document. This doesn’t concern me. No, it doesn’t concern you,
you bureaucratic bastard! You don’t give a crap about us! You conceited pig! – Think about what you’re doing, David!
– Yes, think about it! You should be afraid of my thoughts.
This is one visit you won’t forget. – Please, don’t hit me!
– Glasses off, so I might give you one! I haven’t got the heart…
Your mother might not recognise you. She’d dump you in the refuse chute
during her spring cleaning. Your name is David Lindell.
Allotment 155. You have threatened to assault me.
This is no laughing matter. Not for you,
and not for your young lady. You’ll pay for this,
you proletarian ruffian! Did it feel good? Yes, it did. I’d gladly do it again. David, should we make a run for it? It’s no good. They always get you. Here’s the police file…
“David Lindell, born July 14th, 1918.” “An only child. Parents:
Egon Lindell and his wife, Gertie.” “Few particulars about his childhood,
except for his own accounts” “and a police report dated May 16th,
1923, reporting an assault incident.” Mr. Lindell, could you shed some light
on that incident? – No.
– I see… “Shortly afterwards,
Lindell’s father died.” “His wife was forced to get along
on her own.” “According to Lindell,
she had boarders.” What kind of boarders,
we can only surmise. I have a few guesses myself. “After elementary school,
he got a job at a machine workshop.” In your own words, please. After elementary school,
I got a job at a machine workshop. Yes, we know. – Then I quit my job.
– How come? – I don’t recall.
– You’ve forgotten why? “After his emergency service,
Lindell made no efforts whatsoever” “to return to a regular life.”
Is this true? – I suppose so.
– Why’s that? What’s the use? “In the autumn of ’42, you met
Folke Törnberg, a bike repairman.” I already knew him. I told him
we should commit burglary. – We broke into a sweet stall.
– You got a suspended sentence. – That didn’t seem to deter you.
– What was the use? – What a peculiar explanation.
– You think? “In the autumn of ’44 you were
caught again. A burglary.” – Is that correct?
– I suppose so. Answer a bit more courteously. You committed burglary
together with Törnberg this time too. – Answer me, please.
– Yes. Thus, you violated your probation. Subsequently, the police have
questioned the following people… I was unpleasantly affected,
because I’ve become an honest citizen. I have no dealings with the old gang. My missus said that you have to
think about your principles. So, Lindell and his bird walked away. I let them stay there,
out of pure decency. I have nothing personal against them. But… they did force their entry
into the cottage, after all. Tomatoes? Yes, that’s me. He applied for a position. – He didn’t say a word about his past.
– He sure didn’t. Good labour is hard to find, and I
didn’t ask to see his credentials. A few days after his arrival,
our lovely coffee kettle went missing. – Other things went missing, too.
– A spade, for example. – And a pair of bast shoes…
– It is not advisable, in my opinion. It is not advisable! Would you care to tell me where
Lindell’s diligence money went? He had 200 kronor
when he left prison. It’s only a mere detail,
but of psychological interest. – I don’t know.
– She doesn’t know… Had he no money on him
when you met him at the station? Well, his reserve,
but that was just five kronor. You’d never met him before? Still, you
went with him to this hotel room? – What was I to do?
– That’s true. What were you to do? – Did you know that you were pregnant?
– I’d realised it a few days before. – That’s why I was going back home.
– Who fathered the child? – I don’t know.
– Right. I’m sorry. You didn’t know… Did you know your fiancé, for want of a
better word, had been in prison? – He told me almost immediately.
– Speak up! – He told me almost immediately.
– Still, you went with him? Did you know
that he was prone to stealing? Things like… …this coffee kettle? – Those bloody things were given to us!
– By whom? Let’s say they were given to you
by some kind stranger… No further questions. I’m sorry.
I just have one final little question. Did you try to get rid of the baby? – Didn’t you hear my question?
– Will someone ask Chubby to shut up?! The hearing continues. Please… The defendant made abusive remarks,
and then he assaulted me brutally! I’m indignant, astonished and sad. I am sad. They were a pleasant young couple,
but apparently in dire straits. The young lady was in the family way. “Come to me,
all you who are weary and burdened…” It was quite stimulating
to speak kindly to the young couple. Then, all of a sudden, they just upped
and left! I was left, dismayed. Much to my regret, I must confess the young man turned round
and looked at me with scorn. We have before us two young people,
who have had the opportunity to seek a somewhat meagre,
yet respectful, livelihood. A simple, yet honest, position
in our Swedish society. But they haven’t wished to! With an acute shortage of ideals insensibility and indifference to life’s
and society’s most basic laws they have, like sea creatures,
been swimming with the stream driven by their basest instincts,
their most primitive needs with no thought
of making a life for themselves. With no thought of performing deeds
that are advantageous to society. I feel that society must protect itself
against individuals like these two. At the same time, society must help
protect these two from themselves. It is our duty as Christian, humane
and enlightened citizens to do so in a democratic society. Your honour…? The counsel for the defence
may proceed. – Who is he?
– A stand-in. – I’ve never seen him before.
– I have. I would like to add a few words
to the defence lawyer’s account. To start with, David’s diligence money
was squandered in four days without his knowledge of how.
That was a bad start, I must admit. Those of us conscious of our
responsibilities, like the prosecutor Reverend Berg, myself
and Mr. Andersson would not have squandered our money
in a critical situation. That Thursday evening,
David and Maggi met and decided to spend
the night together. That Maggi was moneyless and that
the two of them found it practical to rent a double room with
the five kronor that David had left is neither here nor there,
strictly speaking. Reverend Berg or myself would never
dream of doing anything of the sort. Spending the night
with a total stranger… Isn’t that right, Rev? Furthermore,
I share the prosecutor’s indignation at the fact that they went to see
Folke Törnberg, David’s old partner to set the ball rolling
towards a new life. Setting a ball in motion must,
of course, be considered suspicious as balls are known to be unreliable
and unstable. Moving on to the unfortunate
breaking and entering. I’m not making excuses for it. I condemn it just as ferociously
as does the prosecutor. He did, however,
leave out a few details. It was cold, and it was raining.
Maggi had sprained her ankle. Neither she nor David had any money. A decent person would not have acted
the way they did, of course but would have gone to a vicarage,
housing an understanding family or slept under the open sky… …in full assurance
that as long as you do the right thing the good Lord above
will spare you pneumonia and death. I object to the defence lawyer’s
sarcastic way of stating events! I have other ways… I, too, have a
witness to call. Mrs. Hanna Ledin! The chaps who borrowed that stuff,
were those two pedlars over there… I think David and Maggi were fools
not to say so. If they didn’t take the articles, then
at least they kept the stolen goods. Unwittingly, in that case.
I never told them. You knew that those two characters
were thieves? – I might have suspected it. So?
– Why didn’t you report it? – That’s none of my business!
– Oh, really?! Stop shouting, for crying out loud.
I’m not deaf! Two coppers were running around there
all day long anyway. I mind my business,
and they mind theirs. Order in the courtroom! Thank you, Mrs. Ledin. I would just like to add,
while I’m at it… I’d like to say,
that if any one of us had to sit where that poor couple is sitting,
when you pull your spaghetti stunt we’d all be crooked and criminal
before you’d reached halfway. Yes, I’ll go back to my seat now. The prosecutor cross-examined
the defendant’s fiancé. It transpired that she had a baby
with an unknown father… – Is that correct?
– Quite. – To my knowledge, David knew this.
– But it didn’t bother him! Despite all of this, he brought Maggi
to the parish registrar’s office to have the banns published.
Is that correct, Reverend? We are highly tolerant,
but the documents must be in order. What are the prosecutor’s thoughts
on this way of acting? David knows that Maggi
is carrying someone else’s child. Still, he buys them a home
and wants to marry her. That’s beyond the point. We’re dealing
with assault on a civil servant. Exactly!
There is one thing he should know: It never pays to punch the distrainor
or the taxman on the nose. If you get rid of one civil servant,
there’ll just be ten more at your door. Were you, Mr. Purman,
particularly accommodating? Neither accommodating nor unfriendly.
I said, “This doesn’t concern me.” – It doesn’t fall under our department!
– Precisely. You said, “This doesn’t concern me.”
Make a note of that, David. You mustn’t get angry with people
who say, “This doesn’t concern me.” Let alone punch them… All you can do is say,
“This doesn’t concern me.” That’s what this whole business
is all about. It’s about two people who would say,
“Nothing concerns us” because they’ve been told,
“You’re no concern of ours.” On the other hand,
we have their love for one another. Their willingness to adapt. Their efforts, albeit awkward,
to fit into society. We should look upon that with favour. A great deal has been said about us,
both good and bad. That’s not what I was going to say… I just wanted to say,
that Maggi and I are in love. We’d like to start afresh, and to make
things better this time round. For what it’s worth,
I’d like to say I’m sorry. I’d like to apologize to Mr. Purman
for punching him. I’d be most grateful
if you didn’t send me back to prison. That’s all I wanted to say. This court is adjourned.
Time to deliberate. Not guilty. Congratulations on the acquittal,
I believe is in order. Time for the three of us
to talk business. – You knew about the allotment.
– But not when it would happen. – You should have thought ahead.
– Why? You have to, before you sign
a document. Always think twice. – I told you so.
– You can forget your weekly rent! I happen to have a certain document.
I’ll hunt you down. – Then we’ll hit the roads again.
– Nonsense. – You want to settle down. I can tell.
– Forget it, you bastard. A bad debt, I take it. Hand me the receipts,
I’m cancelling the purchase. – Why would you want the cottage back?
– Fair is fair. But think carefully. The cottage is yours. Enjoy it!
There’s wood for the winter. Unless I move it…
You could’ve done the same. Or unless I accept the 300 kronor
the town offers you for giving it up… You could’ve done the same. Temper, temper, young man. Now, the debt is paid. You’re made of the right stuff,
but you never look before you leap. You’ll sort yourself out. I’m tired, David. I don’t find
this place beautiful anymore. A few days in the nick,
and there are fences everywhere. Ugly houses, scrubby bushes
and trees with dry twigs… It’s all a big mess. David! Where’s the cottage? That’s where we lived… It never would have been the same,
anyway. Look over there! What a swindler… I can well imagine him unloading it… – On a green meadow…
– …by a lake, in a forest. By a lake… That’s where we should be. Yes… Well, I guess I’d better get going.
Now, don’t forget the address. Time to break up the party.
Do you have all the stuff? – Clearance sale?
– Time to discover the countryside. No bone to pick with the police? No bone to pick with anyone, I’d say. Much obliged.
Take good care of one another. – Where are you going?
– Hitting the roads. What else? – Is that such a great idea?
– Is it cowardly? Well, there are plenty of jobs around. – But you do as you please.
– Yes, we do. Very well. I’m busy elsewhere. It looks like rain. Would you like this? Why, thank you. You’d better get going. I’ll be thinking of you. TO TOWN – TO THE COUNTRYSIDE – Where should we go?
– Don’t be afraid, David. We’ll give it one more try.
This time we might do better. Here comes the rain. I wonder
who that umbrella chap really was. He might have been an angel.

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